BIND 9

Why use BIND 9?

BIND 9 has evolved to be a very flexible, full-featured DNS system. Whatever your application is, BIND 9 probably has the required features. As the first, oldest, and most commonly deployed solution, there are more network engineers who are already familiar with BIND 9 than with any other system.

BIND 9 is transparent open source, licensed under the MPL 2.0 license. Users are free to add functionality to BIND 9 and contribute back to the community through our open Gitlab.

Download the current version of the software from the ISC website

ISC

Choosing a version

We support three major branches of BIND 9 at a time: Stable, Extended-Support, and Development. See this advice: Which version of BIND do I want to download and install? as well as our list of supported platforms.

We also maintain a significant feature matrix and version history.

Installation

Instructions are available for Installing and Upgrading BIND 9. ISC provides executables for Windows and packages for Ubuntu and CentOS and Fedora and Debian - BIND9 ESV, Debian - BIND 9 Stable, Debian - BIND 9 Development version. Most operating systems also offer BIND 9 packages for their users. These may be built with a different set of defaults than the standard BIND 9 distribution, and some of them add a version number of their own that does not map exactly to the BIND 9 version.

Configuration

The BIND Administrator Reference Manual (ARM) included in the BIND distribution is the primary reference for BIND configuration. See the Best Practices documents in our Knowledgebase for configuration recommendations.

Resolver users may find Getting started with Recursive Resolvers to be useful. There are a number of excellent books on BIND; Ron Hutchinson’s DNS for Rocket Scientists is generously posted on the Internet at Zytrax.com and can be a very helpful online reference tool.